We all have a schedule to keep – places to go and people to see, right? Mother nature often has a different opinion of our plans. Cold winter weather and warm, sunny days both present driving challenges. Read on to find out what conditions other drivers wish they could avoid.
Lauren Fix

Lauren Fix

Lauren Fix, The Car Coach, is a nationally recognized automotive expert, analyst, author, and television host.

Driving on Black Ice

There is nothing more dangerous and questionable than driving on black ice. Driving on black ice can be deadly. The worst thing drivers can do is hit the brakes because then you have no control. If you encounter black ice, don’t speed, slow down, give distance between you and the [other] cars and try to place the passenger-side tires on the edge of the road to gain traction.

Direct Sunlight Glare

Locations with flat terrain, such as Arizona, often have horrible sunlight glare around sundown. This condition makes it difficult to see ahead of you without looking directly into the sun. Even the shade visor cannot help you in this situation because it would block your vision. I find it best to avoid driving during this time of day or wearing protective sunglasses.

Kaitlyn Short

Kaitlyn Short

Kaitlyn Short is a Content Marketing Strategist for Best Company, specializing in automotive topics.
Navarre Trousselot

Navarre Trousselot

Navarre is the Founder of Navexa — a portfolio analytics service made for Australian investors.

Reduced Visibility

One thing I really hate is fog. Any type of reduced vision forces me to drive very slowly, and fog is very risky. You have to fully concentrate at all times. You don’t have a clear view of the road, and other drivers may also struggle to see your car. I find these conditions to be very exhausting. I always have a mild headache after driving in the fog for too long.

Compensating for Wild Precipitation

Driving in a mixture of mist, fog, and rain is the worst. I hate it when the weather turns wild whenever I am driving, and I have to deal with the hassles of balancing the car’s air conditioner to clear the windshield, turning headlights and fog lights on and off to find the most suitable [level], and more. Such weather comes with poor visibility, which makes drivers struggle to maintain their lane and drive safely to avoid accidents.

Snow and ice are almost every driver’s nightmare because of having to worry about the road conditions. Anything can happen. It gets slippery. When thinking about such journeys, be prepared for the worst and ensure you are sober enough to think critically.

Harriet Chan

Harriet Chan

Harriet Chan, Co-Founder of CocoFinder.
Jake McKenzie

Jake McKenzie

Jake McKenzie is the Content Manager at Auto Accessories Garage.

The Beginning of a Storm

Rain makes all driving situations more difficult. It reduces visibility and creates a risk of hydroplaning even at moderate speeds, but the roads are the most dangerous just a few minutes into a fresh rainfall. Loose dirt and motor oil start to rise out of the pavement before they can be washed away. After a half-hour or so of heavy rain, the roads should actually start to get a bit safer than they were at the start of the rainstorm.

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